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Fall 2012

ADA Professional Product Review™  Published: Volume 7: Issue 3

From the editor Dr. David Sarrett:

Among the many risks that dentists must manage are percutaneous injuries--those occupational risks presented by sharps, needles and burs. The article, "Safe Injection Practices: Protecting Dentists, Their Staff and Their Patients," looks at preventing percutaneous injuries along with examples of products and resources currently available for that purpose. Also in this issue is an evaluation of vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) occlusal registration materials. The ADA Laboratories purchased and evaluted eight products that were suggested by the ADA Clinical Evaluators (ACE) Panel.

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Summer 2012

ADA Professional Product Review™  Published: Volume 7: Issue 2

From the editor Dr. David Sarrett:

Planning for this issue began shortly after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that it would propose a rule intended to reduce mercury waste from dental offices. The agency plans to focus its technology assessment on amalgam separators, devices designed to capture amalgam waste from dental office wastewater lines before it discharges into public sewer systems. Several states currently require these devcies.

In anticipation of the EPA's proposed rule, the ADA Laboratories purchased and evaluated nine separators available in the U.S. to determine their amalgam removal efficiency. The bottom line--all nine amalgam separators passed the ISO 11143 requirement of 95 percent amalgam removal efficiency.  We've also included an article, "Practical Issues for Purchasing, Installing and Maintaining Amalgam Separators."

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Spring 2012

ADA Professional Product Review™  Published: Volume 7: Issue 1

From the editor Dr. David Sarrett:

In this issue you'll find a dental therapeutics Q&A by Dr. B. Ellen Byrne, which looks at Prolia (denosumab), a new, non-bisphosphonate agent used for the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women who are at high risk for fracture, and includes answers about a common question concerning ibuprofen dosages. You'll also find an evaluation of vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) elastomeric impression materials, the results of tests conducted in the ADA Laboratories. They may not be the most glamorous products in the clinician's armamentarium, but elastomeric impression materials are certainly in the bread-and-butter product category for many dentists. A survey of the ADA Clinical Evaluators (ACE) Panel indicates that the main concerns dentists have with elastomeric impression materials are their ability to reproduce fine detail, resist tearing, perform effectively in a wet field, and have long-term dimensional stability following disinfection. The laboratory evaluation presents data on the physical properties of light-bodied and complementary heavy-bodied formulations for nine brands.

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