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Resources, support available to dentists affected by floods

May 29, 2015

By Kimber Solana

In the wake of severe flooding in Texas and other parts of the country, resources are available to dentists affected by the natural disasters.
The ADA Foundation is working to provide support to dentists through its Emergency Disaster Grant Program. The program may provide grants up to $2,000 to any dentist who is a victim of a declared disaster. The application and guidelines document is available on ADAFoundation.org. For questions, call the ADA Foundation at 1-312-440-2547.

The ADA Foundation accepts tax-deductible donations to its Disaster Assistance Fund, which will be used specifically to aid dentists who have been affected by a disaster. Contributions may be made online on ADAFoundation.org by clicking "Donate: Disaster Assistance."    
In addition, Henry Schein, Inc. announced Thursday that its Henry Schein Disaster Relief Hotline is open for health care providers, including dentists, who experience operational, logistical or financial issues resulting from the disastrous storms in the South Central region of the U.S. The toll-free number for all Henry Schein customers, which is operational from 7 a.m.-7 p.m., is 1-800-999-9729.
Henry Schein is also offering support to its strategic non-governmental organization partners who are assessing the need for health care product donations to assist in relief efforts.
According to the New York Times, severe thunderstorms, floods and tornadoes from Saturday through Tuesday have killed at least 35 people in Texas, Oklahoma and northern Mexico. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott has declared a state of disaster in over three dozen counties. In Oklahoma, Gov. Mary Fallin declared a state of emergency for the entire state.
As rain continues to fall throughout the week, new flooding is forecasted to hit across the region, including parts of Louisiana.  The National Weather Service forecasts "strong to severe storms" to occur today through the evening over the western portions of the Southern Plains, with large hail and locally damaging wind being the main threats.

Meanwhile in Alaska, Gov. Bill Walker on May 21 declared a state disaster in response to flooding that closed a 78-mile stretch of the Dalton Highway. Record-high temperatures accelerated spring snowmelt, according to the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities. Although it's unknown when the road will reopen, as of May 24, officials announced that flood levels had dropped for DOT crews to begin repair work.
In an effort to better prepare you and your staff for such catastrophes, the ADA has created guides and resources to help dentists think about emergency planning and disaster recovery, as well as assist them in creating their own Emergency Action Plan. For ADA guides and resources, which include federal resources to help make sure your practice survives and recover from a catastrophic event, click here.