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Donation fuels research of oral device to treat effects of Tourette's

May 03, 2016

Host with a mission: Radio personality Craig Carton, fifth from left, in December presented a check to the University of Tennessee Health Science Center's Dr. Timothy Hottel, in white coat, for research of a new treatment for Tourette Syndrome.
Memphis, Tenn. — The University of Tennessee Health Science Center is studying a new oral device intended to treat the effects of Tourette syndrome thanks in part to a donation from a New York City radio show host.

Craig Carton, one of the hosts of the "Boomer and Carton" show on sports radio station WFAN in New York, has committed $340,000 from his foundation, TicTocStop, to fund device research. In December, he presented a $100,000 check to the Tennessee school to test a mouthguard-like oral appliance developed to reposition the lower jaw and lessen the severity and frequency of motor and vocal tics associated with Tourette's.

Mr. Carton, who has Tourette syndrome along with two of his children, said use of the "custom, individualized device, called a 'Tic Guard,' can ease the burden faced by those with the condition. 'We can make their lives better and we believe it works,'" he said, according to a news release from the school.

The Tennessee center is the main clinical trial study site and its college of dentistry is conducting the research.

For more information about the trial, click here.