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Review launches study on shade-matching instruments

 

Image: Discussing digital shade-matching instruments
Instruments: From left, Dr. Terence Imbery and Dr. Mary Baechle, professors at VCU School of Dentistry; Dr. David Sarrett, dean, VCU School of Dentistry and editor, The Review; Tim O’Shea of the ADA Division of Science; and Dr. Gilda Ferguson, VCU professor, discuss digital shade-matching instruments in September for an upcoming study in The Review.
The ADA Professional Product Review is collaborating with three dental schools—Virginia Commonwealth University, University of the Pacific and University of Iowa—and the Togus VA Medical Center in Maine on a new study that evaluates shade-matching instruments.

The study is a follow-up to the 2009 product forum at annual session and will address such questions as to whether digital shade matching instruments agree with the color perceptions of the human eye and if dentists and patients differ in shade selection results.

“The color and appearance of teeth is a complex phenomenon and many factors influence the overall perception of tooth color,” said Dr. David Sarrett, editor of the Review and dean, VCU School of Dentistry.

In September, ADA scientists gathered at VCU to provide training on the operation of four color-matching instruments, which include Clōn 3D’s SpectroShade Micro, Olympus’ Crystaleye, Vident’s Vita EasyShade Compact, and X-Rite’s Shade-X. A test protocol, “A  Color Study to Evaluate Performance of 4 Shade Matching Devices Relative to Human Shade Observance” was approved by the ADA Institutional Review Board.

Image: Drs. Bernadette Alvear Fa and Marc Geissberger work with shade-matching instruments as part of a study for the ADA Professional Products Review
Study: During a December visit to ADA Headquarters, Drs. Bernadette Alvear Fa and Marc Geissberger work with shade-matching instruments as part of a study for the ADA Professional Products Review.

“We had such a positive experience with the iTero [digital impression] study for the Review that this was the next logical step,” said Dr. Marc Geissberger, professor and chair, Department of Restorative Dentistry at the University of the Pacific in San Francisco. “My hope is that we’ll be able to provide students and practitioners with information on whether these devices can replace the natural eye [in matching colors] and determine how well they do that.”

Dr. Geissberger and some of his staff recently visited the ADA Laboratories where they received training in how to operate the devices. The school begins the study in January. The results from all the studies will appear in future issues of the Review.

For more information, visit www.ada.org/ppr.