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JADA debuts makeover in January issue

December 11, 2017 Readers of The Journal of the American Dental Association may notice some changes to the ADA's venerable peer-reviewed publication.

Beginning with the January 2018 issue, visual enhancements to the 104-year-old journal will include a different typeface, layout and design meant to offer "more breathing room on the page, with improved leading — or the space between the lines — and more white space," said Michael Springer, senior vice president of business and publishing for the ADA, in commentary that will be published in the January issue. The trim size, or dimensions, of the publication will be larger, conforming to its size before the Great Recession, when the journal underwent a "downsizing" as part of an economic move, Mr. Springer said.

Image of January JADA coverJADA readers also have the opportunity to engage more effectively with online continuing education offered through the journal.

Since November, ADA members have been able to have their CE credits automatically captured in their online records, while nonmembers can still download a record of their credits earned.

The validity of JADA CE exams was also increased to three years, and readers have the option of taking a single credit at a time rather than having to bundle them for the full issue, Mr. Springer said.

The ADA publishing team also introduced JADA+ Clinical Scans in 2017. This new content summarizes clinical studies and systematic reviews from across dental literature in a concise way and highlights their relevance to clinical practice. A listing of new scans appears in every print issue of JADA, and they can be found online at

"Whether you are reading The Journal in print, on your laptop or on your mobile phone, we hope these changes will enhance the experience, and we will continue to look for ways to make JADA an indispensable part of your lifelong learning," Mr. Springer said.