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Standards Committee seeks volunteers for new projects

August 22, 2019 The ADA Standards Committee on Dental Products is looking for volunteers to help develop the following new projects related to dental products and materials:

• Proposed revision of ADA Standard No. 15 for Synthetic Teeth: This standard defines the requirements and test methods for synthetic polymer and ceramic teeth that are manufactured for prostheses used in dentistry. As dental materials continue to advance, the standard needs to evolve with the inclusion of materials that are an amalgamation of different components as well as milled materials.

• Proposed revision of ADA Standard No. 41 for Evaluation of Biocompatibility of Medical Devices Used in Dentistry: This standard concerns the evaluation of the biocompatibility of medical devices used in dentistry. Only test methods with sufficient published data have been included. Minimizing the number and exposure of test animals was a high priority in recommending test methods.

• Proposed revision of ADA Standard No. 63 for Endodontic Instruments –– Auxiliary: This standard specifies requirements and test methods for hand-held or mechanically operated instruments used in root canal procedures. It specifies requirements for size, marking, product designation, safety considerations, labeling and packaging.

• Proposed revision of ADA Standard No. 95 for Endodontic Instruments –– Enlargers: This standard specifies requirements for enlargers, including size, marking, product designation, safety considerations, labeling, packaging and instructions for use.

• Proposed revision of ADA Standard No. 99 for Athletic Mouth Protectors and Materials: This standard covers thermoplastic or thermosetting polymeric materials, with or without a polymeric shell, that are capable of being formed into an athletic mouth protector, either on a model of the teeth or in the mouth directly on the teeth. It lists the types of mouth protectors and lists requirements for physical properties along with tests specified for determining compliance with those requirements. Increased scrutiny by collegiate and professional sports organizations concerning player safety and concussion prevention is on the rise. Mouthguard materials and the role of mouthguards in preventing sports injuries have increased to include the inclusion of diagnostic devices and possible therapeutic modalities. A revision of ADA Standard No. 99 is needed to reflect these changes and update testing modalities.

• Proposed ADA Standard No. 186 for Dental CAD/CAM Machinable Polymer Blanks and Proposed ADA Standard No. 187 for Dental CAD/CAM Machinable Ceramic Blanks: These new standards will specify the requirements and test methods for polymer and ceramic blanks and their machinability for the fabrication of dental fixed and removable restorations.

• Proposed ADA Standard No. 188 for Orthodontic Aligners: As orthodontic aligners require specific requirements for characteristics, physical properties and labeling that are not adequately addressed by American National Standards Institute/ADA Standard 139:2012 Dental Base Polymers, a new standard is being developed to address this fast-developing group of orthodontic materials. The new standard will explain the inherent differences that set materials used for sequential orthodontic aligners apart from other orthodontic base polymers and specify requirements for characteristics and physical properties, test methods, packaging and labeling to help ensure that requirements for fabrication of these materials are met and the materials used are of acceptable quality.

The following new ADA standards will be identical adoptions of the corresponding international standards published by the International Organization for Standardization. Members can review these proposed standards by contacting the ADA:

• Proposed revision of ADA Standard No. 28 for Endodontic Instruments –– Shaping and Cleaning Instruments, adoption of ISO 3630-5:2019 Dentistry –– Endodontic instruments –– Part 5: Shaping and Cleaning Instruments.

• Proposed revision of ADA Standard No. 43 for Mixing Machines for Dental Amalgam, adoption of ISO 7488:2018 Dentistry –– Mixing Machines for Dental Amalgam.

• Proposed revision of ADA Standard No. 48 for Curing Lights (Powered Polymerization Activators), adoption of  ISO 10650:2018 Dentistry –– Powered Polymerization Activators.

• Proposed revision of ADA Standard No. 71 for Endodontic Instruments –– Compactors: Pluggers and Spreaders, adoption of ISO 3630-3:2019 Dentistry –– Endodontic instruments –– Part 3: Compactors: Pluggers and Spreaders.

• Proposed revision of ADA Standard No. 75 for Soft Lining Materials for Removable Dentures –– Part 1: Materials for Short-Term Use, adoption of ISO 10139-1:2018 Soft Lining Materials for Removable Dentures –– Part 1: Materials for Short-term Use.

• Proposed revision of ADA Standard No. 97 for Corrosion Test Methods for Metallic Materials, adoption of ISO 10271:2011 Dentistry –– Corrosion Test Methods for Metallic Materials.

• Proposed ADA Standard No. 145 for Interoperability of CAD/CAM Systems in Dentistry, adoption of ISO 18618:2018 Dentistry –– Interoperability of CAD/CAM Systems.

• Proposed ADA Standard No. 183 for Reprocessable Cartridge Syringes for Intraligamentary Injections, adoption of ISO 21533:2018 Dentistry –– Reprocessable Cartridge Syringes for Intraligamentary Injections.

• Proposed ADA Standard No. 184 for Laser Welding and Filler Materials in Dentistry, adoption of ISO 28319:2018 Dentistry –– Laser Welding and Filler Materials.

• Proposed ADA Standard No. 185 for Integrated Dental Floss and Handles, adoption of ISO 28158:2018 Dentistry –– Integrated Dental Floss and Handles.

The ADA is accredited by the American National Standards Institute to develop American National Standards and technical reports for products and information technology used by dental professionals and consumers.

Currently there are more than 100 national standards, and more are under development. National standards developed by the ADA serve the dental profession by ensuring product safety and efficacy for both clinician and patient and providing information on new and emerging technologies.  

For more information on participating in the Standards Committee working groups that are developing these documents, email standards@ada.org.